Here’s a (small) list of the top books we’d recommend in (design) thinking / strategy / communication:


Thomas Wendt 
Design for Dasein: Understanding the Design of Experiences (2015)

Design for Dasein attempts to apply phenomenological thinking to design in order to further inform what designers (especially what we might call “experience designers”) do in their day to day work. Many activities designers perform every day can be traced back to insights from phenomenology. Activities like user testing, prototyping, sketching, interaction models, personas, interviewing, ethnography, participatory design, and processes like design thinking and lean UX all have phenomenological roots. The book will highlight these connections and explore how they contribute to designing better experiences, providing the reader with new ways of thinking about his or her work, and new strategies for designing systems for both present and future scenarios.

– Amazon


Gjoko Muratovski

Research for Designers: A Guide to Methods and Practice (2016)

Design is everywhere: it influences how we live, what we wear, how we communicate, what we buy, and how we behave. In order for designers to design for the real world, defining strategies rather than just implementing them, they need to learn how to understand and solve complex, intricate and often unexpected problems. This book is a guide to this new creative process. With this book in hand, students of design will:

  • understand and apply the vocabulary and strategies of research methods
  • learn how to adapt themselves to unfamiliar situations
  • develop techniques for collaborating with non-designers
  • find and use facts from diverse sources in order to prove or disprove their ideas
  • make informed decisions in a systematic and insightful way
  • use research tools to find new and unexpected design solutions.

Research for Designers is an essential toolkit for a design education and a must-have for every design student who is getting ready to tackle their own research.

– SAGE Publishing


Marc Hassenzahl 
Experience Design: Technology for All the Right Reasons (2010)

In his In the blink of an eye, Walter Murch, the Oscar-awarded editor of The English Patient,Apocalypse Now, and many other outstanding movies, devises the Rule of Six — six criteria for what makes a good cut. On top of his list is “to be true to the emotion of the moment,” a quality more important than advancing the story or being rhythmically interesting. The cut has to deliver a meaningful, compelling, and emotion-rich “experience” to the audience. Because, “what they finally remember is not the editing, not the camerawork, not the performances, not even the story—it’s how they felt.” Technology for all the right reasons applies this insight to the design of interactive products and technologies — the domain of Human-Computer Interaction, Usability Engineering, and Interaction Design. It takes an experiential approach, putting experience before functionality and leaving behind oversimplified calls for ease, efficiency, and automation or shallow beautification. Instead, it explores what really matters to humans and what it needs to make technology more meaningful.

The book clarifies what experience is, and highlights five crucial aspects and their implications for the design of interactive products. It provides reasons why we should bother with an experiential approach, and presents a detailed working model of experience useful for practitioners and academics alike. It closes with the particular challenges of an experiential approach for design. The book presents its view as a comprehensive, yet entertaining blend of scientific findings, design examples, and personal anecdotes.

-Marc Hassenzahl




What an astonishing thing a book is. It’s a flat object made from a tree, with flexible parts on which are imprinted lots of funny, dark squiggles. But one glance at it, and you’re inside the mind of another person, maybe somebody dead for thousands of years. Across the millennia, an author is speaking clearly and silently inside your head, directly to you. Writing is perhaps the greatest of human inventions, binding together people who never knew each other, citizens of distant epochs. Books break the shackles of time. A book is proof that humans are capable of working magic. Carl Sagan








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